Lorenzo Bodrero (1979) is an Italian journalist who currently works as a freelancer for media such as L’Espresso, Il Fatto Quotidiano, Vice News, Il Corriere della Sera, Narcomafie, Valori, Wired, OCCRP and 100Reporters.

Lorenzo Bodrero studied Communications Science and obtained a degree in Italy and one in the Netherlands. He worked as press officer and communication manager at the European association FLARE Network for four years. He was in charge of FLARE’s online magazine Bright, a web-journal entirely focused on organised crime and corruption-related issues, for three years. Also for FLARE, he coordinated the ‘Best International Organised Crime Report‘ Award

Bodrero currently works as a freelance journalist and collaborates with media such as L’Espresso, Il Fatto Quotidiano, Vice News, Il Corriere della Sera, Narcomafie, Valori, Wired, OCCRP and 100Reporters. In 2015, he took part in the investigation “Unholy Alliances” by OCCRP, which won the Global Shinining Light Award.

Basic information

Name
Lorenzo Bodrero
Expertise
Data Journalist
Country
Italy
City
Torino
Twitter
Website

Supported projects

Mafia in Africa

  • Industry
  • Organised crime

The Italian mafia has established a hidden but lethal presence in Africa. Its members own diamond mines, nightclubs and land, all with the complicity of corrupt regimes.

Mafia in Africa 2

  • Industry
  • Organised crime

Mafia in Africa 2 exposes the fraudulent business empire of Italian criminal Curio Pintus, who was sentenced to three years in jail in 2001 for laundering drug money for the 'ndrangheta, but remains active as CEO of US “merchant bank”, the Pintus Group.

Pulp fiction: Chinese tomato puree, made in Italy

  • Agriculture

SALERNO - A great amount of capital is invested in agriculture and gains juicy but illegal returns. Nearly one in three 'Made in Italy'-labeled goods sold in Italy or exported elsewhere are produced with non-Italian products.

Security for sale: the price we pay to protect Europeans

  • Europe
  • Science
  • Terrorism

Since the late 1990s, the European Union has worked to encourage a European security market, where major defence and technology companies develop products and services that better protect us from crime and terrorism. This industry should also create jobs and be globally competitive. Over the past year, more than twenty journalists in eleven European countries investigated this burgeoning sector. And they discovered there’s a lot wrong with the European security market.