Lorenzo Bagnoli is board member of the Investigative Reporting Project Italy (IRPI), a centre for investigative journalism based in Italy.

He holds a Master in Journalism awarded by the Catholic University in Milan. Currently he is also a contributor at Il Fatto quotidiano and Q CODE Magazine. He worked for Peacereporter, E il mensile (Emergency), Linkiesta and Lettera43. In 2014, he published Lezioni di mafia, a book based on 12 lessons of former general anti-mafia prosecutor Pietro Grasso.

Bagnoli also filmed Vacanze forzate, a documentary about the massive flow of immigrants from North Africa during the Arab springs that was presented at the Milano film festival 2011. He received a special mention at the Gruppo dello zuccherificio prize for investigative journalism with a project on visa trafficking called Paper borders.

Basic information

Name
Lorenzo Bagnoli
Country
Italy
City
Milano

Supported projects

Mafia in Africa

  • Industry
  • Organised crime

The Italian mafia has established a hidden but lethal presence in Africa. Its members own diamond mines, nightclubs and land, all with the complicity of corrupt regimes.

Mafia in Africa 2

  • Industry
  • Organised crime

Mafia in Africa 2 exposes the fraudulent business empire of Italian criminal Curio Pintus, who was sentenced to three years in jail in 2001 for laundering drug money for the 'ndrangheta, but remains active as CEO of US “merchant bank”, the Pintus Group.

Security for sale: the price we pay to protect Europeans

  • Europe
  • Science
  • Terrorism

Since the late 1990s, the European Union has worked to encourage a European security market, where major defence and technology companies develop products and services that better protect us from crime and terrorism. This industry should also create jobs and be globally competitive. Over the past year, more than twenty journalists in eleven European countries investigated this burgeoning sector. And they discovered there’s a lot wrong with the European security market.