Craig Shaw is a British journalist specialising in corruption, human rights, and cross-border investigations. He also has an interest in Turkish issues.

His reports have been published in leading European media - and he has been involved in several high-profile collaborative investigations, such as ‘Offshore Leaks with the ICIJ, ‘Football Leaks’ and ‘Malta Files’ for European Investigative Collaborations (EIC.network).  He is interested in Turkish politics and corruption, and coordinates the Turkish investigations for  theblacksea.eu  and EIC.

Basic information

Name
Craig Shaw
Expertise
human rights, Turkey
Country
Romania
City
Bucharest
Twitter

Supported projects

Ghosts of Sochi

  • Corruption
  • Politics
  • Sport

Seven years under construction at a reputed cost of over 40 billion Euro, the Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia are the most expensive sporting event in history.  But the Games also had a human cost.

Mafia in Africa

  • Industry
  • Organised crime

The Italian mafia has established a hidden but lethal presence in Africa. Its members own diamond mines, nightclubs and land, all with the complicity of corrupt regimes.

Mafia in Africa 2

  • Industry
  • Organised crime

Mafia in Africa 2 exposes the fraudulent business empire of Italian criminal Curio Pintus, who was sentenced to three years in jail in 2001 for laundering drug money for the 'ndrangheta, but remains active as CEO of US “merchant bank”, the Pintus Group.

Passport for profit

  • Corruption
  • Europe
  • FOI
  • Migration
  • Organised crime

Thousands of refugees from Africa and the Middle East risk their lives to reach the shores of Europe and escape conflict and repression.  But for the wealthy there are easier options available. With enough money, it's possible to purchase a EU passport - or at least residence. 

Security for sale: the price we pay to protect Europeans

  • Europe
  • Science
  • Terrorism

Since the late 1990s, the European Union has worked to encourage a European security market, where major defence and technology companies develop products and services that better protect us from crime and terrorism. This industry should also create jobs and be globally competitive. Over the past year, more than twenty journalists in eleven European countries investigated this burgeoning sector. And they discovered there’s a lot wrong with the European security market.